JetHub Private Jet Charter Blog

5 Utilization Strategies For Private Jets

1.  Transportation of Employees

The most common use of private jets is to transport employees to meet company objectives. For strategic meetings, new market research, client relationships and meeting with investors.

2.  Transportation of Customers

Quite often companies will utilize a private jet to bring clients to visit a facility to launch a new product or service. The opportunity to make presentations and hold meetings with clients and prospects on the private flight are a major selling point for the usage.

3.  Transportation of SuppliersAir Ambulance

Businesses are able to accelerate and improve supply chain by transporting suppliers efficiently on a private jet. The ability to transport several suppliers for meetings or interaction with clients or just improve supplier relations is key.

4.  Transportation of Cargo, Parts

It is extremely efficient to transport cargo and parts between company facilities, suppliers, customers and potential customers. Larger volume of shipments could potentially reduce overnight shipping cost, especially if the flight is accompanied by a company official. 

5.  Humanitarian and Charity Flights

It's a known fact that private jets support people and communities in crisis by flying supplies, patients, blood and organs. Recently it has become common for military families to be connected via private jet. One well know mission is for emergency relief to victims of natural disaters.

Topics: Private Jet private aviation industry business jet

NBAA Business Aviation Forum Draws Record Crowd

The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) held a business aviation forum at Teterboro airport in New Jersey. With over 1,900 people in attendance, the NBAA set a new record turnout for the event. Several business aviation forums are sponsored by the NBAA and held all over the country. The events feature new private jet models on display and booths for over 80 exhibitors. Also featured were education sessions on the importance of safety management systems, the future of business aircraft values and the No Plane No Gain Advocacy Campaign.

These business aviation forums provide education and networking opportunities to regional businesses involved in private jet manufacturing, operators and private jet brokers. The forums serve as a venue to make new business connections and discover new technologies, products and services being offered in the business aviation community.

It also allows for discussions regarding issues that affect regional aviation business, such as new airport policies, city council ordinances and new pieces of legislation that affect private jet travel and the business aviation industry. The forums serve to inform local aviation businesses about issues affecting them and provide them with information on how to make their voices heard as a community.

The record turnout in New Jersey, and the equally successful turnouts at other business aviation forums around the country show growing enthusiasm for the business aviation industry, as well as a positive trend in local aviation business involvement in advocacy. The upswing in aviation businesses involved in advocacy has made significant improvements on the status of the private jet industry. New legislation is being developed on national and state levels in support of the $150 billion dollar industry. Forums such as the one hosted by the NBAA are an important tool in garnering support for private aviation.

For more information on the dates and location of NBAA business aviation forums, visit www.nbaa.org/events. 

Topics: Legislation private aviation industry business aviation

Common Myths about Private Jet Travel Debunked

There are a number of misperceptions surrounding private jet travel. Many people believe that private jet travel is inaccessible to them, and that only extremely wealthy people and huge corporations can afford to fly on private jets. This is not true. Here are several common private jet travel myths debunked:


1. Only top-level CEOs of huge corporations fly on private jets.

In truth, only 22% of private jet travelers are at the executive level. Most business jet clients are mid-level executives of small companies with less than 500 employees.

2. Private jet travel is a waste. Why not just fly commercial?

80% of private jet flights are made to airports with little to no commercial airline service. In addition, there are almost no non-stop commercial flights going to these smaller airports.

3. Private jet travel is so expensive, there's no way I could afford it.

While owning a private jet may be expensive, many private jet clients use charter brokers to book their flights. Jet charter brokers find the best travel options at the lowest prices, often saving clients thousands of dollars. In addition, private jet travel saves businesses money by maximizing productivity and minimizing lost opportunity costs.

4. The business aviation industry is not a significant contributor to the US economy.

Business aviation contributes over $150 billion dollars to the US economy. The private aviation industry also provides millions of jobs. In addition, the industry is one of the few industries left that remains almost completely on US soil and doesn't outsource manufacturing overseas.

If you're considering private jet travel for the first time, try using a private jet broker like JetHub. Brokers like JetHub compare prices from hundreds of operators nationwide to find you the safest flight at the best price. They work with you every step of the way to ensure that all your travel needs are met and that your first private jet travel experience exceeds your expectations.

 

To learn more about the benefits of the business aviation industry, go visit www.noplanenogain.org. 

Topics: private jet charter private aviation industry business aviation charter broker

Advocating for the Private Jet Industry

"No Plane, No Gain" is the name of an advocacy campaign supported by different organizations and businesses in the private jet industry. Started by the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) and the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA), the advocacy campaign attempts to garner support from legislators and the public for private aviation. No Plane No Gain advocates the value of private jet aviation to the public, the economy, the business and the individual. Private aviation is a $150 billion dollar industry that provides millions of jobs, helps businesses expand and become more efficient and allows for humanitarian and emergency missions.

One of the strongest arguments the No Plane No Gain advocacy campaign makes is that private jets can reach thousands of airports that commercial airlines don't fly to. Major airlines operate out of approximately only 70 hubs throughout the United States, but there are over 5,000 airports that private jets can access.

Aviation is also an incredibly valuable export, with about half of American-made private airplanes being exported overseas. There is little to no outsourcing to overseas factories. Quite the opposite is true. Most of the few overseas private jet manufacturers there are send their planes to the United States to be finished, since the United States is the leader in avionics, private jet engines and many other system technologies. Also worth mentioning are the millions of private jets that are brought to the United States for maintenance, servicing and upgrading.

The private aviation industry is an industry that produces some of the most highly skilled, well trained laborers. Wage averages are high and there is excellent job security. In addition to manufacturers, mechanics and developers, there are pilots, dispatchers, schedulers, operators and millions more that keep private aviation thriving in the United States.

Private jet aviation also helps other businesses. It not only allows businesses to provide goods and services to smaller cities and rural areas, it also allows them to travel to multiple destinations in the same day. Private jet travel allows businesses to respond to time-critical situations, save time and increase productivity. Increased productivity and expanded markets equals more opportunities and increased profits for all businesses using private jets.

The private aviation industry is highly valuable to the United States economy. No Plane, No Gain seeks to educate the public on that fact and lobby for legislation that will support a healthy industry.

Topics: Legislation private aviation industry aviation private jet travel

Private Aviation Industry Showing Signs of Recovery

Private aviation was one of the many markets to reach the peak of the economic high from 2005 to 2008 with many businesses and individuals buying private planes. There was also a high demand for partial jet ownership and money saving programs like jet cards for frequent private plane travelers. When the bubble burst in 2009, the private aviation industry experienced a sharp decline.

Compounding the difficulties of a strained global economy were the harsh criticisms from US politicians and media regarding the private aviation industry as evidence of big business wastefulness. Many businesses cancelled orders for private planes and executives curtailed their use of private jets in exchange for less efficient commercial flights.

Slowly but surely, private aviation is getting back on its feet. The first quarter of 2010 has shown promise of a return to a thriving market for private aviation. Private plane sales have begun to increase and Gulfstream reported the first quarter of 2010 as its biggest sales quarter since 2008. Criticism of private jet use has eased in the media.

Additionally, commercial airlines have become less attractive with reduced seat capacity, numerous airline strikes, longer wait times and extra fees. With frequent delays and hassles, private aviation has become financially attractive again with all of the opportunity cost saved through more efficient time and money management. Businesses pay slightly more for the flight, but save money everywhere else.

While the private aviation industry is still facing hardship, experts believe that the industry will be recovered by 2011.

For more information, view articles here and here.
Topics: private aviation industry business aviation private aircraft private jet travel 2009

Volcanoes & Labor Strikes: More Reasons Supporting Private Jet Travel

The list of benefits to private jet travel is long and plentiful. The last three months have provided two examples that have caused unrelenting disruption to commercial airline passengers from March through May.


Iceland's Volcano Disrupts AviationIceland's volcano:

Eyjafjallajokul Volcano in Iceland erupted in March 2010, and, for most travelers, the consequences of that eruption are still being felt. The massive cloud of volcanic ash given off by the eruption clouded the skies and grounded all European commercial airlines for days, leading to weeks of disruptions for all commercial travelers.

Despite the inability of commercial airlines to fly, private jets were still able to fly without a problem. So, while travelers using commercial airlines were stranded, some for over a week, at the airport waiting for a flight, private jet travelers arrived at their destination on time, as expected.

 

Recent labor strikes:

Commercial airlines are often heavily unionized, which means that labor strikes can and do occur on a semi-regular basis. Right now, British Airways cabin crews are striking because of wage disagreements. They have selected to strike during the busiest travel season for Europe, and may jeopardize many people's plans to travel to South Africa for the World Cup. Spirit Airlines in the United States is also staging a similar strike this summer. Airline unions wait until the busiest seasons to go on strike because it has the biggest ramifications on travelers and the employing company. This means that all the innocent commercial airline travelers trying to make it to home for Christmas or to their long-planned summer vacation often are unable to get to their destination at all due to labor strikes.

Private jet charter clients know that the flight they booked is theirs and won't leave the runway without them. They know that they will arrive at the World Cup exactly as planned because the personalized service of private jet charter companies guarantees it. Business executives take comfort in the confidence that they will be home in time for dinner, without the long, grueling, uncertain journey that flying commercially has become.


Topics: General Aviation aviation business private jet charter private aviation industry aviation private jet travel

What is a Jet Card and Why is it Replacing Fractional Jet Ownership?

As most people familiar with the aviation industry know, fractional jet ownership programs are steadily on the decline. This is because fractional jet ownerships are inefficient and a bad investment. The other reason is because they are being pushed out by the future of private jet travel for frequent fliers: jet cards.

Jet Card 2.0
A jet card is a prepaid debit card that is bought in 25-hour increments. Participants in jet card programs can book a flight on a jet anytime, anywhere, with very little advance notice. Even more convenient, clients have already paid so they don't have to take the time to go to the bank, wire the money and sign the paperwork.


What really makes jet card programs so desirable? Fixed rates. It costs the same amount per hour to fly from Seattle to Houston as it does from Los Angeles to New York, or anywhere else. For clients that fly to multiple destinations in the US regularly, this can mean huge savings, sometimes thousands of dollars. It also means being reassured that the fee is always the same - no surprises. Programs like the Jet Card 2.0TM program from JetHub take it one step farther by including fuel in the hourly rate. Many private jet charter companies use fuel as a way to make extra money on flights, sometimes charging clients up to $10,000 per year in inflated fuel costs.


In sum, a jet card program is:


• A smarter financial investment than fractional jet ownership - no inflation, no depreciation of assets, and planes are always available when clients need them. No blackout days.
• Cheaper than booking flight-by-flight for long trips. A fixed hourly rate saves bi-coastal travelers (think Los Angeles-New York) thousands of dollars per year.
• Money saved on fuel costs. With fuel built into the price, there are no surprise costs outside of what was already paid.
• No surprises and no waiting. Clients pay in advance and fly whenever they want, wherever they want, without any hassle.

 

Now is an especially good time to purchase a jet card. JetHub, a private jet charter company based in Arizona, is offering a promotional special on the Jet Card 2.0TM. Buy 25 hours and get 5 hours free with your first purchase. Save over $21,000!


Topics: JetCard 2.0 private aviation industry fractional jet ownership private jet travel

Fractional Jet Ownership Declining for Private Jet Industry

 

Fractional Jet Ownership

 

Fractional jet ownership has been a popular mode of affordable private jet travel since its inception in the mid-80s. Recently, however, smart travelers are making the switch to private jet charter services for their travel needs. While both options afford the benefits of time-savings, flexibility, luxury, and convenience, private jet charter is a more reasonable and usually more convenient alternative.


More people are now realizing that fractional jet ownership is one of the most costly ways to enjoy the luxury of traveling about in a private jet without buying one outright. Although not as expensive as jet ownership, partial jet ownership still passes along the cost of owning, operating, and maintaining a jet aircraft along to its owners. Partial owners are charged whether or not they fly, and many owners for one jet can create a nightmare of conflicts, especially on common traveling holidays like Thanksgiving. In these instances, some partial jet owners end up on private jet charter flights anyway due to a lack of capacity in the partially owned fleet. This introduces unnecessary hassle and overhead, and makes fractional jet companies less efficient and less able to handle the needs of passengers.


When travelers are in a position where they need or prefer a private jet for their air travel, the typical 5-year minimum commitments for partial ownership and minimum number of flight hours are off-putting to some. Private jet charter is quickly becoming the preferred method of aviation for those looking for convenience, reliability, and money savings without being locked into a specific aircraft. Private jet passengers want to be able to specify when, where, and how they travel without being locked into a particular aircraft and without having to work around others' schedules, and the private jet charter industry is an affordable option to cater to these passengers' specific needs.

Topics: private jet charter private aviation industry fractional jet ownership