JetHub Private Jet Charter Blog

2011 First Half Private Aircraft Sales Report

private jet

Total worldwide sales of general aviation aircraft fell 15.5 percent in the first six months of this year. General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMMA) shows total billing of general aviation aircraft of $7.3 billion, which is down 22.3 percent.

GAMA and an aerospace workers union made a statement which blamed political rhetoric for the demonization of the industry resulting in fewer jobs. 

According to GAMA, piston powered airplane shipments were down 37 units from 424 units delivered in the first six months of 2010, a 8.7 percent decrease.  Turboprop plane shipments declined by 143 units, a 8.9 percent drop. Business jets have also suffered, down 26.5 percent to only 261 units.

Topics: General Aviation aviation business business jet private aircraft

Charter a Private Flight on a Hawker 400XP

Hawker 400XP Light JetThe Hawker 400XP stands out in its class. Its flexibility allows it to be one of the most versatile light jets on the market, adapting to suit any need or purpose. The Hawker 400XP has the ability to land safely even on short runways, allowing it to access thousands of airports inaccessible to larger, clumsier jets. This private jet can land safely on runways as short as 3,280 ft. 

The convenience and efficiency of the Hawker 400XP do not force it to sacrifice in the luxury department. On the contrary - this private light jet rivals any larger jet with features like clean lines, plenty of headroom and a recessed aisle. It can comfortably seat up to six people. 

To learn more about the Hawker 400XP, or to reserve one for your next private jet charter trip, call (888) 435-9774 today!

Hawker 400XP Private Light Jet Interior

Passenger Capacity:  6 people 
Cruising Speed:  420 mph 
Range:  1480 sm 
Length:  13.6 ft. 
Width:  4.9 ft. 
Height:  4.8 ft. 
Baggage Capacity:  53 cu.ft. 
Topics: private aircraft

Top Ten Airports for Private Jet Travel - #7 Dulles International

Executive Jet Travel

Located in Washington D.C., Dulles International Airport serves most of the aviation needs in the greater D.C. area. Dulles International is only 26 miles from the central business district of Washington D.C. Construction began in the 1950s and the airport officially opened in 1962. It is named for the US Secretary of State, John Dulles, who served under Dwight D. Eisenhower’s presidency. The main terminal was designed by a famous Finnish architect names Eero Saarinen, and it is now a well-known landmark.

Executive Jet Travel to Washington D.C.

The airline has 143 gates and typically sees more than 1,000 flight operations per day. Over 23.9 million people travel through Washington Dulles International Airport annually, with many of them being executive jet travelers flying privately. With 83 nonstop US destinations and 43 nonstop international destinations, Washington Dulles International is a major American travel hub for executive jet travelers and commercial fliers alike. The airport is conveniently located near two major highways and recently opened a new Aero Train System earlier in 2010.

Due to its proximity to Washington D.C., a major US hub of commerce and politics, Washington Duller International Airport experiences a high volume of executive jet travelers. The numerous amenities, such as private lounges and quality restaurants, also make the airport an attractive one for stopovers.

Topics: Business Private Jet private jet charter Charter Flights executive jet travel private aircraft private jet travel

Private Aviation Industry Showing Signs of Recovery

Private aviation was one of the many markets to reach the peak of the economic high from 2005 to 2008 with many businesses and individuals buying private planes. There was also a high demand for partial jet ownership and money saving programs like jet cards for frequent private plane travelers. When the bubble burst in 2009, the private aviation industry experienced a sharp decline.

Compounding the difficulties of a strained global economy were the harsh criticisms from US politicians and media regarding the private aviation industry as evidence of big business wastefulness. Many businesses cancelled orders for private planes and executives curtailed their use of private jets in exchange for less efficient commercial flights.

Slowly but surely, private aviation is getting back on its feet. The first quarter of 2010 has shown promise of a return to a thriving market for private aviation. Private plane sales have begun to increase and Gulfstream reported the first quarter of 2010 as its biggest sales quarter since 2008. Criticism of private jet use has eased in the media.

Additionally, commercial airlines have become less attractive with reduced seat capacity, numerous airline strikes, longer wait times and extra fees. With frequent delays and hassles, private aviation has become financially attractive again with all of the opportunity cost saved through more efficient time and money management. Businesses pay slightly more for the flight, but save money everywhere else.

While the private aviation industry is still facing hardship, experts believe that the industry will be recovered by 2011.

For more information, view articles here and here.
Topics: private aviation industry business aviation private aircraft private jet travel 2009

FAA Certification for the Cessna Citation CJ4 Business Jet

 Cessna CJ4

The new Cessna Citation CJ4 is part of the Citation line of business jets by Cessna. The Citation CJ4 is now the biggest in this group of jets and promises noticeable performance and safety improvements. In addition to standard equipment, the CJ4 offers several upgraded features. The specifications for the new Cessna are:

  • Takeoff distance of 1,130 ft at maximum weight
  • Landing distance of 2,700 ft
  • Can reach 45,000 ft in 28 minutes
  • Flies up to 453 knots
  • Range just over 2,000 nautical miles
  • Four-screen Collins Pro Line Avionics suite
  • Electronic charts and graphical weather
  • TCAS II
  • Emergency Descent Mode
  • EGPWS Class A Taws
  • Multi-scan weather radar
  • ADS-B Out capability
  • Essential electrical bus

The aircraft will also debut the new electronically-controlled engines, the Williams International FJ44-4A engine, that the FAA also approved only recently. These engines perform significantly better than others in the same class due to improved technology. It allows business jets to takeoff and land on shorter runways typically used by turboprops only.  The FJ44-4 engine has the best thrust to weight ratio in its class, allowing it to be incredibly fuel efficient.

The newest member of the Citation line will retail for approximately $9 million per jet and deliveries will begin later this year.
Topics: Private Jet business jet private aircraft cessna jet citation jet faa aviation