JetHub Private Jet Charter Blog

Advocating for the Private Jet Industry

"No Plane, No Gain" is the name of an advocacy campaign supported by different organizations and businesses in the private jet industry. Started by the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) and the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA), the advocacy campaign attempts to garner support from legislators and the public for private aviation. No Plane No Gain advocates the value of private jet aviation to the public, the economy, the business and the individual. Private aviation is a $150 billion dollar industry that provides millions of jobs, helps businesses expand and become more efficient and allows for humanitarian and emergency missions.

One of the strongest arguments the No Plane No Gain advocacy campaign makes is that private jets can reach thousands of airports that commercial airlines don't fly to. Major airlines operate out of approximately only 70 hubs throughout the United States, but there are over 5,000 airports that private jets can access.

Aviation is also an incredibly valuable export, with about half of American-made private airplanes being exported overseas. There is little to no outsourcing to overseas factories. Quite the opposite is true. Most of the few overseas private jet manufacturers there are send their planes to the United States to be finished, since the United States is the leader in avionics, private jet engines and many other system technologies. Also worth mentioning are the millions of private jets that are brought to the United States for maintenance, servicing and upgrading.

The private aviation industry is an industry that produces some of the most highly skilled, well trained laborers. Wage averages are high and there is excellent job security. In addition to manufacturers, mechanics and developers, there are pilots, dispatchers, schedulers, operators and millions more that keep private aviation thriving in the United States.

Private jet aviation also helps other businesses. It not only allows businesses to provide goods and services to smaller cities and rural areas, it also allows them to travel to multiple destinations in the same day. Private jet travel allows businesses to respond to time-critical situations, save time and increase productivity. Increased productivity and expanded markets equals more opportunities and increased profits for all businesses using private jets.

The private aviation industry is highly valuable to the United States economy. No Plane, No Gain seeks to educate the public on that fact and lobby for legislation that will support a healthy industry.

Topics: Legislation private aviation industry aviation private jet travel

Business Jet Safety Improves by 69% in 2009

Private aviation has become increasingly safer in the last few years, with 2009 being a record low for the number of accidents for both turboprops and business jets. While the decrease in accidents is slightly in part to the reduced number of private flights last year, there was still a large enough difference to be significant.

Analysts reason that the increased safety is due to improved simulation technology that allows pilots to train by practicing different simulated situations. Pilots are more able to react quickly and, thanks to the new technology, in a practiced, confident manner that may make all the difference.

Private planes have also become safer to fly with improvements in engine technology and navigation systems. These improvements include many new features that act as built-in back up plans for private pilots. Fuel additives have also dramatically improved business jet safety as they prevent fuel systems from icing over in high altitudes.

For private jet charter clients, the assurance of a safe flight is even greater. With safety tracking and reporting systems like ARG/US and Wyvern that report safety ratings, clients can ensure that everything checks out before ever boarding the plane. Flight safety reports rate both the pilot and plane based on a series of rigorous maintenance and inspection regulations. Private flight providers can become Part 135 Carrier Certified, meaning they have met all protocols.

As technology continues to improve, business aviation and private jet charter will only become safer. The 69% decrease in accidents from 2008 to 2009 demonstrates how much difference one year of technology can make.

Topics: private jet charter business jet safety aviation

Relief Efforts by Private Planes in Haiti Earthquake Recognized

On January 12th, the island of Haiti experienced a massive earthquake with devastating consequences. Many people, organizations and businesses rallied from all over the world to come to the aid of vulnerable Haitians. The problems in Haiti were complicated due to the difficulties of getting aid to those who needed it most. Boat transport was too slow and air transport was very expensive. Many of the airports had been damaged.

Recognizing the extreme need in Haiti, many aviation businesses volunteered time, flights, and other aviation related services. The National Business Aviation Association reports that hundreds of plane owners, operators and pilots contacted the NBAA and colleagues to coordinate relief efforts. They estimate that in the first five days after the airport in Port-au-Prince was reopened to humanitarian flights, approximately 100 flights bringing relief came from the United States. In another two days, this number increased to 330, with about half of the requests to land coming from civilian aircraft. 

The National Business Aviation Association played such a significant role in the Haiti relief efforts that their work has been recognized in Congress by both the House and the Senate. Business aviation participants organized the transport of cargo, supplies and medical relief to the areas most in need. 

The NBAA has continued to advocate the role of the business aviation community in Haiti earthquake relief. NBAA members continue to fly relief missions to Haiti and other areas in crisis. 

Topics: business aviation earthquake relief aviation nbaa haiti

Volcanoes & Labor Strikes: More Reasons Supporting Private Jet Travel

The list of benefits to private jet travel is long and plentiful. The last three months have provided two examples that have caused unrelenting disruption to commercial airline passengers from March through May.


Iceland's Volcano Disrupts AviationIceland's volcano:

Eyjafjallajokul Volcano in Iceland erupted in March 2010, and, for most travelers, the consequences of that eruption are still being felt. The massive cloud of volcanic ash given off by the eruption clouded the skies and grounded all European commercial airlines for days, leading to weeks of disruptions for all commercial travelers.

Despite the inability of commercial airlines to fly, private jets were still able to fly without a problem. So, while travelers using commercial airlines were stranded, some for over a week, at the airport waiting for a flight, private jet travelers arrived at their destination on time, as expected.

 

Recent labor strikes:

Commercial airlines are often heavily unionized, which means that labor strikes can and do occur on a semi-regular basis. Right now, British Airways cabin crews are striking because of wage disagreements. They have selected to strike during the busiest travel season for Europe, and may jeopardize many people's plans to travel to South Africa for the World Cup. Spirit Airlines in the United States is also staging a similar strike this summer. Airline unions wait until the busiest seasons to go on strike because it has the biggest ramifications on travelers and the employing company. This means that all the innocent commercial airline travelers trying to make it to home for Christmas or to their long-planned summer vacation often are unable to get to their destination at all due to labor strikes.

Private jet charter clients know that the flight they booked is theirs and won't leave the runway without them. They know that they will arrive at the World Cup exactly as planned because the personalized service of private jet charter companies guarantees it. Business executives take comfort in the confidence that they will be home in time for dinner, without the long, grueling, uncertain journey that flying commercially has become.


Topics: General Aviation aviation business private jet charter private aviation industry aviation private jet travel

FAA Certification for the Cessna Citation CJ4 Business Jet

 Cessna CJ4

The new Cessna Citation CJ4 is part of the Citation line of business jets by Cessna. The Citation CJ4 is now the biggest in this group of jets and promises noticeable performance and safety improvements. In addition to standard equipment, the CJ4 offers several upgraded features. The specifications for the new Cessna are:

  • Takeoff distance of 1,130 ft at maximum weight
  • Landing distance of 2,700 ft
  • Can reach 45,000 ft in 28 minutes
  • Flies up to 453 knots
  • Range just over 2,000 nautical miles
  • Four-screen Collins Pro Line Avionics suite
  • Electronic charts and graphical weather
  • TCAS II
  • Emergency Descent Mode
  • EGPWS Class A Taws
  • Multi-scan weather radar
  • ADS-B Out capability
  • Essential electrical bus

The aircraft will also debut the new electronically-controlled engines, the Williams International FJ44-4A engine, that the FAA also approved only recently. These engines perform significantly better than others in the same class due to improved technology. It allows business jets to takeoff and land on shorter runways typically used by turboprops only.  The FJ44-4 engine has the best thrust to weight ratio in its class, allowing it to be incredibly fuel efficient.

The newest member of the Citation line will retail for approximately $9 million per jet and deliveries will begin later this year.
Topics: Private Jet business jet private aircraft cessna jet citation jet faa aviation