JetHub Private Jet Charter Blog

Rachel Dixon

Recent Posts by Rachel Dixon:

Private Jet Charter Advantage of the Day: Good Food

Everyone has heard horror stories about the quality of airline food, or experienced its lackluster charms firsthand. Given the option of either a mysterious TV tray dinner or a stale sandwich, most passengers try to survive the long day of travel by sustaining themselves pretzels alone. Nowadays, most commercial airlines don’t bother offering food, or even peanuts.  

Private jet charter means a lot of things, but mostly it means that your traveling experience is tailored to you. Fly in the type of plane you want, leave when you’re ready and bring your dog or your guitar on board if you want. Chartering a private jet also means eating whatever you want. Feel like having Thai food catered on your flight? Go ahead. Are you vegetarian or allergic to peanuts? No problem. Private jet charters will cater your flight with any food or beverages you want.

Flying no longer has to mean a day of bad food. Private jet charter clients can eat well and enjoy their favorite meals in-flight. Just tell your private jet charter representative what kind of food you want catered on your next charter flight, and it will be there waiting for you when you board the plane.

Topics: private jet charter private jet travel

NBAA Business Aviation Forum Draws Record Crowd

The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) held a business aviation forum at Teterboro airport in New Jersey. With over 1,900 people in attendance, the NBAA set a new record turnout for the event. Several business aviation forums are sponsored by the NBAA and held all over the country. The events feature new private jet models on display and booths for over 80 exhibitors. Also featured were education sessions on the importance of safety management systems, the future of business aircraft values and the No Plane No Gain Advocacy Campaign.

These business aviation forums provide education and networking opportunities to regional businesses involved in private jet manufacturing, operators and private jet brokers. The forums serve as a venue to make new business connections and discover new technologies, products and services being offered in the business aviation community.

It also allows for discussions regarding issues that affect regional aviation business, such as new airport policies, city council ordinances and new pieces of legislation that affect private jet travel and the business aviation industry. The forums serve to inform local aviation businesses about issues affecting them and provide them with information on how to make their voices heard as a community.

The record turnout in New Jersey, and the equally successful turnouts at other business aviation forums around the country show growing enthusiasm for the business aviation industry, as well as a positive trend in local aviation business involvement in advocacy. The upswing in aviation businesses involved in advocacy has made significant improvements on the status of the private jet industry. New legislation is being developed on national and state levels in support of the $150 billion dollar industry. Forums such as the one hosted by the NBAA are an important tool in garnering support for private aviation.

For more information on the dates and location of NBAA business aviation forums, visit www.nbaa.org/events. 

Topics: Legislation private aviation industry business aviation

Common Myths about Private Jet Travel Debunked

There are a number of misperceptions surrounding private jet travel. Many people believe that private jet travel is inaccessible to them, and that only extremely wealthy people and huge corporations can afford to fly on private jets. This is not true. Here are several common private jet travel myths debunked:


1. Only top-level CEOs of huge corporations fly on private jets.

In truth, only 22% of private jet travelers are at the executive level. Most business jet clients are mid-level executives of small companies with less than 500 employees.

2. Private jet travel is a waste. Why not just fly commercial?

80% of private jet flights are made to airports with little to no commercial airline service. In addition, there are almost no non-stop commercial flights going to these smaller airports.

3. Private jet travel is so expensive, there's no way I could afford it.

While owning a private jet may be expensive, many private jet clients use charter brokers to book their flights. Jet charter brokers find the best travel options at the lowest prices, often saving clients thousands of dollars. In addition, private jet travel saves businesses money by maximizing productivity and minimizing lost opportunity costs.

4. The business aviation industry is not a significant contributor to the US economy.

Business aviation contributes over $150 billion dollars to the US economy. The private aviation industry also provides millions of jobs. In addition, the industry is one of the few industries left that remains almost completely on US soil and doesn't outsource manufacturing overseas.

If you're considering private jet travel for the first time, try using a private jet broker like JetHub. Brokers like JetHub compare prices from hundreds of operators nationwide to find you the safest flight at the best price. They work with you every step of the way to ensure that all your travel needs are met and that your first private jet travel experience exceeds your expectations.

 

To learn more about the benefits of the business aviation industry, go visit www.noplanenogain.org. 

Topics: private jet charter private aviation industry business aviation charter broker

4 Reasons Why Private Jet Brokers are the Smartest Way to Travel

Not everyone can afford to own their own personal private jet, and many of those that can still prefer to charter a jet using a private jet broker. Here are four big reasons why using a private jet broker is the smartest way to travel.

1. No Commitments or Risks. Private jet charter using a broker is the most affordable option and involves the least amount of commitment and involvement from the client. Unlike private jet owners, who have to worry about licensing, maintenance and operational costs of a depreciating asset, clients who charter a private jet simply book a flight and go.

2. Best Prices. Private jet brokers use their industry knowledge and contacts to find the best price for each flight. They compare prices from many different owners and operators. When booking directly through an operator, there is no price shopping or competition. Operators may take advantage of the client and upcharge for fuel or other hidden costs that a broker knows to watch out for.

3. Safety. Private jet brokers also ensure that both the jet and pilot are current on all safety regulations and licensing requirements. Brokers such as JetHub only work with operators that are Part 135 Carrier Certified, which requires them to meet rigorous inspection and maintenance protocols.

4. Tailored Travel. Private jet brokers tailor each flight to personal preferences. Operators have a limited number of planes available, and there is no guarantee that the plane you want will be ready and available when you need it. Brokers can find the type of plane you want and have it when and where you need it since they work with hundreds of operators nationwide.

Private jet brokers save you time and money by finding you the flight you want, at the best price available and ensuring all safety standards are met, all with little to no commitment or effort from you, the client.

The best part? A good broker can do all this with as little as four hours' notice.

Topics: private jet charter charter broker

Advocating for the Private Jet Industry

"No Plane, No Gain" is the name of an advocacy campaign supported by different organizations and businesses in the private jet industry. Started by the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) and the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA), the advocacy campaign attempts to garner support from legislators and the public for private aviation. No Plane No Gain advocates the value of private jet aviation to the public, the economy, the business and the individual. Private aviation is a $150 billion dollar industry that provides millions of jobs, helps businesses expand and become more efficient and allows for humanitarian and emergency missions.

One of the strongest arguments the No Plane No Gain advocacy campaign makes is that private jets can reach thousands of airports that commercial airlines don't fly to. Major airlines operate out of approximately only 70 hubs throughout the United States, but there are over 5,000 airports that private jets can access.

Aviation is also an incredibly valuable export, with about half of American-made private airplanes being exported overseas. There is little to no outsourcing to overseas factories. Quite the opposite is true. Most of the few overseas private jet manufacturers there are send their planes to the United States to be finished, since the United States is the leader in avionics, private jet engines and many other system technologies. Also worth mentioning are the millions of private jets that are brought to the United States for maintenance, servicing and upgrading.

The private aviation industry is an industry that produces some of the most highly skilled, well trained laborers. Wage averages are high and there is excellent job security. In addition to manufacturers, mechanics and developers, there are pilots, dispatchers, schedulers, operators and millions more that keep private aviation thriving in the United States.

Private jet aviation also helps other businesses. It not only allows businesses to provide goods and services to smaller cities and rural areas, it also allows them to travel to multiple destinations in the same day. Private jet travel allows businesses to respond to time-critical situations, save time and increase productivity. Increased productivity and expanded markets equals more opportunities and increased profits for all businesses using private jets.

The private aviation industry is highly valuable to the United States economy. No Plane, No Gain seeks to educate the public on that fact and lobby for legislation that will support a healthy industry.

Topics: Legislation private aviation industry aviation private jet travel

Business Jet Safety Improves by 69% in 2009

Private aviation has become increasingly safer in the last few years, with 2009 being a record low for the number of accidents for both turboprops and business jets. While the decrease in accidents is slightly in part to the reduced number of private flights last year, there was still a large enough difference to be significant.

Analysts reason that the increased safety is due to improved simulation technology that allows pilots to train by practicing different simulated situations. Pilots are more able to react quickly and, thanks to the new technology, in a practiced, confident manner that may make all the difference.

Private planes have also become safer to fly with improvements in engine technology and navigation systems. These improvements include many new features that act as built-in back up plans for private pilots. Fuel additives have also dramatically improved business jet safety as they prevent fuel systems from icing over in high altitudes.

For private jet charter clients, the assurance of a safe flight is even greater. With safety tracking and reporting systems like ARG/US and Wyvern that report safety ratings, clients can ensure that everything checks out before ever boarding the plane. Flight safety reports rate both the pilot and plane based on a series of rigorous maintenance and inspection regulations. Private flight providers can become Part 135 Carrier Certified, meaning they have met all protocols.

As technology continues to improve, business aviation and private jet charter will only become safer. The 69% decrease in accidents from 2008 to 2009 demonstrates how much difference one year of technology can make.

Topics: private jet charter business jet safety aviation

Private Aviation Industry Showing Signs of Recovery

Private aviation was one of the many markets to reach the peak of the economic high from 2005 to 2008 with many businesses and individuals buying private planes. There was also a high demand for partial jet ownership and money saving programs like jet cards for frequent private plane travelers. When the bubble burst in 2009, the private aviation industry experienced a sharp decline.

Compounding the difficulties of a strained global economy were the harsh criticisms from US politicians and media regarding the private aviation industry as evidence of big business wastefulness. Many businesses cancelled orders for private planes and executives curtailed their use of private jets in exchange for less efficient commercial flights.

Slowly but surely, private aviation is getting back on its feet. The first quarter of 2010 has shown promise of a return to a thriving market for private aviation. Private plane sales have begun to increase and Gulfstream reported the first quarter of 2010 as its biggest sales quarter since 2008. Criticism of private jet use has eased in the media.

Additionally, commercial airlines have become less attractive with reduced seat capacity, numerous airline strikes, longer wait times and extra fees. With frequent delays and hassles, private aviation has become financially attractive again with all of the opportunity cost saved through more efficient time and money management. Businesses pay slightly more for the flight, but save money everywhere else.

While the private aviation industry is still facing hardship, experts believe that the industry will be recovered by 2011.

For more information, view articles here and here.
Topics: private aviation industry business aviation private aircraft private jet travel 2009

Relief Efforts by Private Planes in Haiti Earthquake Recognized

On January 12th, the island of Haiti experienced a massive earthquake with devastating consequences. Many people, organizations and businesses rallied from all over the world to come to the aid of vulnerable Haitians. The problems in Haiti were complicated due to the difficulties of getting aid to those who needed it most. Boat transport was too slow and air transport was very expensive. Many of the airports had been damaged.

Recognizing the extreme need in Haiti, many aviation businesses volunteered time, flights, and other aviation related services. The National Business Aviation Association reports that hundreds of plane owners, operators and pilots contacted the NBAA and colleagues to coordinate relief efforts. They estimate that in the first five days after the airport in Port-au-Prince was reopened to humanitarian flights, approximately 100 flights bringing relief came from the United States. In another two days, this number increased to 330, with about half of the requests to land coming from civilian aircraft. 

The National Business Aviation Association played such a significant role in the Haiti relief efforts that their work has been recognized in Congress by both the House and the Senate. Business aviation participants organized the transport of cargo, supplies and medical relief to the areas most in need. 

The NBAA has continued to advocate the role of the business aviation community in Haiti earthquake relief. NBAA members continue to fly relief missions to Haiti and other areas in crisis. 

Topics: business aviation earthquake relief aviation nbaa haiti

Private Jet Advantage of the Day: Pets

There are countless advantages to flying on a private jet. The entire experience is specifically tailed to you and your needs. Traveling with pets is one example of how private jets simplify traveling, saving you time and trouble. Pets and Private Jet Travel

Think how great it would be if you could bring your animal companion with you on your skiing trip to Aspen or to your vacation home. Unlike commercial airline passengers who must submit all kinds of paperwork and sedate their pet in order to place it in the cargo bay, when you fly on your private jet, you can simply bring your dog along.

Private jet travelers can easily bring their dogs, cats, or fish (no fluid restrictions) on the plane. Dogs and cats have plenty of room to sit or lay quietly, and don't need to spend the trip in a traumatic and confining cage in the cargo bay. Even better, your pet will be treated to the same luxury and service standards you are, with fresh water and comfortable accommodations.

True pet lovers can even take it one step further by having food available on board. Did you book yourself an in-flight massage? Why not book one for your animal companion as well?

Topics: private jet travel pets

Volcanoes & Labor Strikes: More Reasons Supporting Private Jet Travel

The list of benefits to private jet travel is long and plentiful. The last three months have provided two examples that have caused unrelenting disruption to commercial airline passengers from March through May.


Iceland's Volcano Disrupts AviationIceland's volcano:

Eyjafjallajokul Volcano in Iceland erupted in March 2010, and, for most travelers, the consequences of that eruption are still being felt. The massive cloud of volcanic ash given off by the eruption clouded the skies and grounded all European commercial airlines for days, leading to weeks of disruptions for all commercial travelers.

Despite the inability of commercial airlines to fly, private jets were still able to fly without a problem. So, while travelers using commercial airlines were stranded, some for over a week, at the airport waiting for a flight, private jet travelers arrived at their destination on time, as expected.

 

Recent labor strikes:

Commercial airlines are often heavily unionized, which means that labor strikes can and do occur on a semi-regular basis. Right now, British Airways cabin crews are striking because of wage disagreements. They have selected to strike during the busiest travel season for Europe, and may jeopardize many people's plans to travel to South Africa for the World Cup. Spirit Airlines in the United States is also staging a similar strike this summer. Airline unions wait until the busiest seasons to go on strike because it has the biggest ramifications on travelers and the employing company. This means that all the innocent commercial airline travelers trying to make it to home for Christmas or to their long-planned summer vacation often are unable to get to their destination at all due to labor strikes.

Private jet charter clients know that the flight they booked is theirs and won't leave the runway without them. They know that they will arrive at the World Cup exactly as planned because the personalized service of private jet charter companies guarantees it. Business executives take comfort in the confidence that they will be home in time for dinner, without the long, grueling, uncertain journey that flying commercially has become.


Topics: General Aviation aviation business private jet charter private aviation industry aviation private jet travel