JetHub Private Jet Charter Blog

3 Reasons to Use a Broker For Your Next Private Jet Charter

  1. When looking for the best service and overall peace of mind for your next charter flight, try creating a relationship with a charter broker. Broker's are not biased on using aircraft in their fleet, mainly because they do not have a fleet. Brokers take all request from their clients to the open market where charter operators bid on the specific trip. This huge marketplace enables the broker to have visibility of all available aircraft and locate the perfect fit for your charter flight.private jet, jet safety, charter flights
  2. Industry relationships are very important in the small community of private jet chartering. A charter flight broker normally has an established relationship with the highest rated and safest operators in the industry. The main focus of the broker should be to find the right aircraft that is operated by the best rated company. Most companies are rated by one of two firms, ARG/US or Wyvern/PASS. Both of these ratings provide a complete look into the safety record, insurance and pilot type ratings. These reports can be supplied to the client on every trip, be sure to ask your private jet charter broker for this information.
  3. Charter flights don't end with finding the right aircraft for the mission. There is catering, ground transportation and any number of special request, all of which a charter broker is able to arrange for the client. A broker can be looked at as your personal flight department. The professional manner in which most broker's conduct business is focused on one thing; provide their clients' service that is Beyond Safety...Luxury...Expectation.
Topics: Private Jet private jet charter Charter Flights charter broker

Cancer Patients Fly Free on Private Jets

Orlando, FL, October 22, 2009 - The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) today announced that $168,000 was raised at the NBAA/CAN Charity Benefit at the 62nd Annual Meeting & Convention in Orlando, FL, with the proceeds going to Corporate Angel Network (CAN).

"We are truly delighted that we were able to help raise so much for such a worthy cause, and we are most appreciative to those who gave so generously," said Ed Bolen, NBAA president and CEO.

Based in White Plains, NY, CAN is the only charitable organization in the United States whose sole mission is to ease the emotional stress, physical discomfort and financial burden of travel for cancer patients by arranging free flights to treatment centers, using the empty seats on business aircraft.

Kathleen Blouin, NBAA senior vice president of conventions, seminars & forums, said the benefit would not have been possible without the efforts of Auction Committee members who organized the fund-raising Live and Silent Auctions for the event. Specifically, she pointed to the effective work done by CAN Executive Director Peter Fleiss, North American Communications President and NBAA Director Mike Herman, Flying Publisher Dick Koenig and Aviation International News Publisher Wilson Leach.

"We thank everyone involved with the benefit, and we are pleased that we were able to support the life-saving missions CAN provides," Bolen added. "We look forward to continuing to support CAN's work through our NBAA/CAN Charity Benefit and other initiatives."

For more information about CAN, or to make a direct donation, visit www.corpangelnetwork.org.

Topics: General Aviation Private Jet Private Jet Legislation

Press Release - Arnold Palmer Supports General Aviation

Golf Icon, Esteemed Businessman Featured in New Video, Print Ads

Contacts: Dan Hubbard, (202) 783-9360, dhubbard@nbaa.org
Katie Pribyl, GAMA, (202) 393-1500, kpribyl@gama.aero

Orlando, FL, October 20, 2009 -Golf legend and accomplished businessman Arnold Palmer is lending his voice to support the value of business aviation to citizens, companies and communities in a new video and print advertising campaign for No Plane No Gain, the advocacy program jointly sponsored by the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) and the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA).

"Arnold Palmer has always been an advocate for business aviation, because he has a first-hand understanding of its essential role in serving towns and communities across the country," said NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen. "For his entire career, business aviation has made it possible for him to succeed in golf and business - all from his hometown of Latrobe, PA, which doesn't have airline service."

GAMA President and CEO Pete Bunce added: "Through these new ads, we will be able to draw even more attention to the messages No Plane No Gain has been communicating: that business aviation supports over a million jobs, represents a lifeline for small- and medium-sized U.S. towns, enables companies to compete and succeed, and helps provide relief to people and communities in times of crisis."

The new advertising, rolled out during the Opening General Session of NBAA's 62nd Annual Meeting & Convention, includes three print ads and three 30-second video ads. The print and video ads complement one another, and build upon the efforts already undertaken through the No Plane No Gain program to educate policymakers and opinion leaders about the value of business aviation to citizens, companies and communities across the U.S.

With a simple, yet powerful delivery, Palmer speaks to the benefits of business aviation in the ads and responds to those who would devalue the use of an airplane for business. For example, in one print ad, Palmer states: "People who build business airplanes make things fly. People who use them make things happen. A few others make things up." In one of the video spots, Palmer states plainly: "For more than 50 years, using business airplanes is the single most productive thing I have done."

Addressing the large crowd gathered at the Opening General Session, Palmer explained why he felt compelled to lend his voice to the No Plane No Gain program. "I know the value of business airplanes," Palmer said. "I know what they have done for me and my companies. I know how important they are to my hometown. And I know how important they are to this country. So I wanted to speak out and help set the record straight."

To view the video ads, visit the No Plane No Gain web site:
http://www.noplanenogain.org/Video_Advertisements.htm?m=47&s=385
To view the print ads, visit the No Plane No Gain web site:
http://www.noplanenogain.org/Print_Advertisements.htm?m=47&s=416
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ABOUT GAMA
The General Aviation Manufacturers Association represents 67 of the world's leading manufacturers of fixed-wing general aviation airplanes, engines, avionics, and components. In addition to building nearly all of the general aviation airplanes flying today, GAMA member companies also operate aircraft fleets, airport fixed-based operations, pilot training, and maintenance facilities worldwide. To learn more, visit: www.gama.aero.

ABOUT NBAA
Founded in 1947 and based in Washington, DC, the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) is the leading organization for companies that rely on general aviation aircraft to help make their businesses more efficient, productive and successful. The Association represents more than 8,000 companies and provides more than 100 products and services to the business aviation community, including the NBAA Annual Meeting & Convention, the world's largest civil aviation trade show. Learn more about NBAA at www.nbaa.org.

Topics: General Aviation Private Jet Private Jet Legislation

Gulfstream Launches New G650 Private Jet

Gulfstream's new top-of-the-line private jet, the G650, rolled out of the Savannah, Ga., factory on Sept. 29. The airplane rolled out under its own power, in front of an audience of over 7,000 onlookers.

"Our customers had an instrumental role in the design of the G650," said Pres Henne, Gulfstream's senior vice president of programs, engineering and test. "The G650 will set new levels of performance in aircraft capability, cabin environment, and maintainability. Customer input was used to guide fuselage selection as well as aircraft performance characteristics."

The G650 will come with what the company calls Gulfstream Cabin Essentials. This includes redundant fiber optic and wireless technologies, along with the "latest innovations in lighting, seating, acoustics, and cabin systems," said Henne.

Gulfstream announced the G650 in March 2008. The airplane is set for its first flight later this year and is expected to be certified in 2011. First deliveries are planned for 2012.

The G650 seats 11 to 18 passengers; is powered by two Rolls-Royce BR725 A1-12 engines of 16,100 lb thrust apiece; has a maximum cruise speed of Mach 0.90; and can fly 7,000 nm at Mach 0.85. Maximum operating altitude is 51,000 feet.

Topics: Business Private Jet Private Jet private jet charter

Frequent Fliers Climb into the Cockpit of Private Plane

Ms. Kornegay, who owns and operates two hotels in Mount Olive, N.C., drives to nearby Mount Olive Municipal Airport and flies her personal private plane across the state to an airport near Charlotte. The entire trip takes one and a half hours. "That adds up to an additional five hours each week that I can be doing something else," she says.

Self-piloting doesn't make sense for every business owner, but can be a rewarding experience. If you want to become a private pilot, flight instruction typically costs up to $9,000, according to the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association in Frederick, Md., and there is the cost of the plane, the initial investment, plus annual fees for storage and maintenance.

The Federal Aviation Administration estimates the number of pilots with a private license has decreased by about 14% in the last 10 years.

Allowing some entrepreneurs who travel frequently the ability to travel when the time is right, makes sense when you consider the time savings from avoiding long drives and airport delays. "There's not necessarily a monetary case to be made for it," says AOPA spokesman Chris Dancy. "But when you start to add in lost productivity and the additional hotel and rental car expenses, aviation makes a much stronger case than trips using airlines."

The AOPA estimates that the cost of flying an aircraft provides the most return for flights that are less than 500 miles.

About 85% of companies that use personal aircraft are small or midsize companies, estimates Ed Bolen, president and chief executive of the National Business Aviation Association in Washington.

As CEO of McColla Enterprises Ltd. in Topeka, Kan., which owns the Street Corner mini-convenience store chain, Mr. La Colla flies to visit his 50 franchise locations in places such as Danbury, Conn., Bloomington, Minn., and Nashville. "I just wanted to swing through those cities but doing that commercially would be miserable," he says.

Mr. La Colla says his time in the air costs about $100 an hour, including the fuel, oil, repairs and engine wear. So flying time from Topeka to Chicago, which is just shy of 600 miles and takes more than two hours each way, costs almost $500 round trip. That trip on the commercial airlines averages about $150.

But that doesn't account for the extra five hours of agony Mr. La Colla would have to spend driving to/from a commercial airport, passing through security, and the inconvenience of traveling on the restricted schedule of the airlines.

Businesses also get the benefit of the expense write-off and depreciation of a company owned private plane. General aviation provides for thousand of jobs and creates greater efficiencies for all air travelers.

Source: The Wall Street Journal 

Topics: Business Private Jet General Aviation Private Jet Legislation